Archive for the ‘fall internship’ category

Q: What are your best tips for finding a fall internship?

September 13, 2010

A.You have lots of resources on internships.com to help you get started. If you don’t know exactly what kind of internship you want, the Internship Predictor can help you out. Here are our top 5 tips to remember when you begin your search:

  1. Visit your Career Center for advice. You may find that new internships have come in since school started. Companies usually offer internship opportunities year-round to a school. The virtual or remote internship often works well for a Fall internship because you can work online at your own convenience and not miss any classes or activities.
  2. How many hours can you work, and where? You may be limited by class hours and location. If you have transportation issues, you could consider taking an internship on campus.
  3. Review your resume and cover letter.  Update your resume with any summer accomplishments, including jobs, volunteer work, sport achievements, travel, or new skills, such as foreign languages. Write a basic cover letter that you can customize for every application.
  4. Network! Talk to other students, friends, and family members about your interest in a Fall internship. They may know of an opening in their companies. A potential intern may have had to step down from the internship, leaving it vacant. Then, send out your resume and customized cover letter, using your contact person as a reference.
  5. Create your own internship. If nothing comes up that you want, design your own Fall internship in a company that appeals to you. Write up a proposed internship description and send it to the human resources department and follow up with a phone call to set up an appointment. Present your ideas and your available hours and you may soon find yourself in the perfect Fall internship.

Good luck!  Have other tips you could recommend?  Please list them in the comments!

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A. Absolutely. You have lots of resources on internships.com to help you get started. If you don’t know exactly what kind of internship you want, the Internship Predictor can help you out. Or the Company Directory can help you identify companies and people that you want to reach. Here are our top 5 tips to remember when you begin your search:

  1. Visit your Career Center for advice. You may find that new internships have come in since school started. Companies usually offer internship opportunities year-round to a school. The virtual or remote internship often works well for a Fall internship because you can work online at your own convenience and not miss any classes or activities.
  2. Decide how many hours you want to put into a Fall internship and where you want to do your internship. You may be limited by class hours and location. If you have transportation issues, you could consider taking an internship on campus.
  3. Review your resume and cover letter, updating your resume with any summer accomplishments, including jobs, volunteer work, sport achievements, travel, or new skills, such as foreign languages. Write a basic cover letter that you can customize for every application.
  4. Network. Talk to other students, friends, and family members about your interest in a Fall internship. They may know of an opening in their companies. A potential intern may have had to step down from the internship, leaving it vacant. Then, send out your resume and customized cover letter, using your contact person as a reference.
  5. Create your own internship. If nothing comes up that you want, design your own Fall internship in a company that appeals to you. Write up a proposed internship description and send it to the human resources department and follow up with a phone call to set up an appointment. Present your ideas and your available hours and you may soon find yourself in the perfect Fall internship.
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5 Tips: Find internship opportunities online

September 10, 2010

You can find thousands of internships online—internships.com alone lists nearly 21,000 postings featuring over 10,000 companies! And if you already know the company in which you want an internship, you can go directly to the company on internships.com or to the company Web site for more information on how to apply for an internship. Here are our top 5 tips for maximizing your success in finding online internship openings:

1.      Understand the search process, which is similar to Googling. Enter the keywords, such as the field/major, state, or city. If you’re unsure of what you want, search all states or enter a broad field, such as Communications. Then, narrow your choices by paid or unpaid, college credit or not, or by hours required. Be wary of internships that lack descriptions or don’t list responsibilities. If you’re uncertain about a company, Google it to find our more about its history and business operations.

2.      Check dates. Each online internship posting lists a date, stating when the internship starts. More and more internships have open dates and are available year-round, allowing you to do your internship at a time that fits your schedule. Companies are becoming much more flexible, so even if the posted dates are not convenient, the company may work to accommodate your availability. Don’t hesitate to ask.

3.      Update your resume and cover letter. Make sure that you add all new information, including any campus organizations that you’ve just joined or class projects or volunteer work that you’ve begun. Since most online internships involve phone interviews, you might want to consider what you would say during the interview. You could even ask a friend to role play with you in preparation.

4.      Explore virtual or remote internships. Doing an internship from your own computer in your dorm room can seem like an excellent way to gain experience. But be sure to check them out carefully since you won’t be onsite. Find out how much mentoring you’ll receive and who will be your key contact. Do get a clear description of the type of work you’ll be doing. It helps if you can view the work of former virtual interns. And review the terms of payment, academic credit, and expected hours.

5.      Follow up on your online applications. Email each company to make sure that your application was received, and ask how long the process will take. Indicate your enthusiasm for the internship, emphasizing your skills. If you have the name of the person who receives the online applications, direct your inquiries to that person. Otherwise, call the company and ask the receptionist to connect you to the appropriate department or person. Since a company may receive hundreds of online applications, you want to make sure that your name stands out.

Top Tips To Help You Manage Your Schedule When Classes Start

August 30, 2010

Most internships have set hours noted in the internship descriptions. However, more and more internships have flexible hours to accommodate students. Here are some tips on getting help from your internship supervisor to develop your internship schedule.

  1. Explain your class schedule, work hours, and any commitments, such as team practice because you’re on a sports scholarship.  Your concern over these other obligations demonstrates to your supervisor that you’ll have the same dedication to duty at your internship.
  2. Come prepared with a proposed new schedule, providing your supervisor with a good starting point rather than expecting him/her to develop your schedule for you.
  3. When you create your customized schedule, consult the company calendar, too, to incorporate holidays. At most internships, the number of hours completed is more important than when they’re completed because the total number is often connected to how many academic credits you’ll receive.
  4. Consider alternate schedule options. Rather than coming every day, you could suggest staying for more hours per day and coming fewer days. You might ask if your internship could be extended, so you’re doing fewer hours a day over a longer period of time. Or you could investigate putting some internship hours into the weekend.
  5. Also consider blending on-site work with remote or virtual internship work, which could work well with your busy life. Ask your supervisor if you could do some assignments, such as research or report writing, at your computer in your dorm room, keeping track of your hours. If the supervisor is not as flexible as you would like and you value your internship, you might have to compromise by rescheduling a class or cutting back on your work hours. It’s a balancing act but well worth the effort.

Q. Are there internships available during the school year?

July 23, 2010

A. Yes, lots of them in lots of different places. And since many students only take summer internships, you may have a better chance of getting an internship during the school year. The good news is that more and more companies want to keep interns coming all year-round. After the company educates an intern supervisor and sets up a working program, it makes good sense to maintain the routine—and capitalize on the extra help—365 days a year. Here are some of your options: 

  • Start with your own school, especially if you live on campus. Begin at the career center, asking the staff about on-campus internships. Or visit the different departments, such as your major department, in which you’d like to intern, present your resume, and ask about openings.
  • Next, scout out the surrounding companies that are geographically within reach by public transportation or car. Again, check in with your career center about local internships and make application. You may want to request an information interview with a company about internships in order to get your foot in the door.
  • Look into a virtual internship (Check out these great virtual opportunities!), which allows students to sample different fields or concentrate on a niche industry while still going to classes and working. The most common ones are in information technology, software development, research, sales, marketing, blogging, and social media. If you’re a self-reliant, self-starter who is comfortable with Web conferences, emails, and phone calls, a virtual internship during the school year might work well for you.
  • Create your own internship by networking with other students, faculty, and staff professionals at your school to discover any potential internship sites. Many companies that have never had professional internship programs are interested in setting them up. If you locate a local company in which you’d like to intern during the school year, but it has no established program, suggest that your school help the company initiate a good program. 
  • Explore the opportunity of an internship during the school year in a company in a different locale. If it’s a full-time internship with academic credit, you may want to talk with your academic advisors about rearranging your classes or going to school an extra semester in order to take advantage of a great internship. Keep an open mind, and the right internship during the school year will be yours.

For an intern’s perspective on doing an internship during the school year, check out the new Eye of the Intern blog, “Tracey’s Angle: Is a school-year internship worth it?“.

Q. I didn’t find a summer internship. Is it too early to look for a fall one?

June 25, 2010

A. Absolutely not, especially if you want to get a really good one. There are lots of resources on internships.com to help you get started. If you don’t know exactly what kind of internship you want, the Internship Predictor can help you out. Or the Company Directory can help you identify companies and people that you want to reach. For good measure, you could complete the Intern Certification Program. And check out the Intern Tool Kit for other resources. Here are a few more tips:

  1. Lay out your fall schedule. Decide how many hours you want to put into a fall internship and where you want to do your internship. You may be limited by class hours and location. If you have transportation issues, you could consider taking an internship on campus in a department that is relevant to your career interests.
  2. Review your resume and cover letter, making sure that you have updated your resume with any summer accomplishments, including jobs, volunteer work, sport achievements, travel, or new skills, such as foreign languages. Internships.com will help you decide if a video resume is appropriate for you. Write a basic cover letter that you can customize for every application.
  3. Visit your Career Center for advice. These professionals work with companies and help you get interviews with the proper personnel. Companies usually offer internship opportunities year-round to a school. Discuss the many new options that are available to you, thanks to technology. The online internship often works well for a fall internship because you can work at your own convenience.
  4. Network. Talk to other students, friends, and family members about your plans for a fall internship and ask them for suggestions. The best way to evaluate an internship is to talk to a student who has just completed it.
  5. Tracey’s Angle. Check out the newest Eye of the Intern blog by internships.com intern, Tracey. She has some great tips for finding a fall internship.